Type of Content: Research

Subtype: Journal Article

Resource Title: Unemployment at 50+: Economic and Psychosocial Consequences

Publication Title: Springer

Publish Date: 2021

Drawing on interdisciplinary, cross-national perspectives, this open access book contributes to the development of a coherent scientific discourse on social exclusion of older people.

In this chapter, we draw attention to the latent functions of work and the psycho- social consequences of job loss in later life. Applying a life-course perspective, the aim of this chapter is to explore how job loss can be framed as a form of acute economic exclusion, and how this exclusion can have significant implications for poor mental health. We start by considering ageing and work and positioning the experience of work within the older adult life course. We provide a brief look at ageing in general, and the phase of middle adulthood in particular, before turning to the specifics of the older adult worker. We then look at the latent functions of work, which can be closely linked to the framework of old-age exclusion (Walsh et al. 2017; Walsh 2019). We then turn to the economic and psychosocial consequences of unemployment. As the German novelist Thomas Mann (2019) observed “Work is hard, is often a bleak and tedious prodding; but not working – that is hell”. Focusing on the experiences of older unemployed persons in Luxembourg, we will present selected survey findings around the subjective experience of unemployment and coping processes, and their relationship with psychosocial well-being. We present this analysis in an effort to inform policy development for assisting older adults in dealing with the economic and psychosocial consequences of unemployment.

Unemployment at 50+: Economic and Psychosocial Consequences

Resource URL: https://bit.ly/39zRKBt