Type of Content: Research

Subtype: Journal Article

Resource Title: The Gerontologist

Publication Title: The Uneven Later Work Course: Intersectional Gender, Age, Race, and Class Disparities

Publish Date: March 4, 2021

Abstract

Objectives

Later adult work attachments and exits are in flux, suggesting the need for understanding both the range of contemporary population-level pathways of work and non-work and variations by overlapping social locations. We document patterned continuity and change in monthly work attachments and analyze the intersecting effects of age, gender, education, and race/ethnicity.

Methods

We capitalize on massive micro-level 16-month panel data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) from 2008 through 2016 to empirically identify patterned pathways of monthly states: working full time, long hours, part time; being self-employed or unemployed; not working because of a disability, due to family care or other reasons, or because one defines oneself as retired.

Results

Analyses of 346,488 American women and men ages 50 to 75 reveal patterned elasticity in the timing and nature of work attachments in the form of six distinctive pathways. Our intersectional analyses illustrate divergences and disparities: advantages for educated white men, disadvantages for low-educated Black men and women through their early 60s, and intersecting effects of gender, education, and race/ethnicity during the later work course across age groups. We find convergence across social markers by the 70s.

The Uneven Later Work Course: Intersectional Gender, Age, Race, and Class Disparities

Resource URL: https://bit.ly/3lbFDiy